Big reopening for Tiny Town

After a canceled 2020, attraction set to get back on track Memorial Day weekend

Glenn Wallace
gwallace@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 5/18/21

Tiny Town has survived floods and encroaching fires. Lucky for area children, it has also survived COVID-19. The diminutive municipality opens for the year at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 29. After sitting …

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Big reopening for Tiny Town

After a canceled 2020, attraction set to get back on track Memorial Day weekend

Posted

Tiny Town has survived floods and encroaching fires. Lucky for area children, it has also survived COVID-19.

The diminutive municipality opens for the year at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 29.

After sitting closed for 20 months, Tiny Town’s workers and volunteers are cleaning, polishing and prepping for the opening.

“We’re really looking forward to opening!” seasonal employee Bettiann said (last name withheld).”It’s just a joy to see how people love to come here.”

It’s an opening day that didn’t always look likely amid pandemic and financial worries.

“It’s been a long haul,” General Manager Elvira Nedoma said.

With the business unable to open to the public in 2020, Nedoma said it struggled last year. Since it runs on volunteers and seasonal employees, Tiny Town was not eligible to receive forms of government assistance available for other businesses.

A dozen volunteers help run the five little train engines that circle the grounds, while a regular roster of eight seasonal employees keep the town running.

“They come back year after year,” Nedoma said, herself in her 21st year at Tiny Town. “Some of them have been here longer than me!”

Eric Witulski, a seasonal employee now in his 13th season, was busy setting up the gift shop with Bettiann on a sunny afternoon last week. After missing out on a season of work, he said he was happy to be back and expecting a busy summer.

“I think everybody who lives nearby and has kids should check it out,” he said.

Tiny Town was first opened in 1915 by George Turner. Originally named Turnerville, it survived the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918.

On top of the current pandemic, Tiny Town has also had to deal with vandalism over the last few months. Someone spray-painted on the entryway. A hacker also ruined the website.

Nedoma said overall, though, public support for Tiny Town has been heartening. She set up a fundraiser to support Tiny Town through the pandemic, which raised more than $30,0000 in donations and helped pay the bills last year.

“Without that, who knows,” Nedoma said.

The future looks good for Tiny Town, according to Nedoma, with several day camp organizations already scheduling time to come up.

“Kids love this place, and they’ve been cooped up inside, staring at screens,” Nedoma said. “They just need to get outside.”

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